The Benefits Of 64 Bit Computing Explained

There is still a degree of confusion in the market place as to what exactly 64 – bit computing is, where it fits in and what it is used for.

While many processors are 64- bit ready unless you have a 64- bit operating system they are more or less redundant as using a standard version of windows XP or Vista (both of which are 32-bit) will not allow you to access the existing power in your PC or Cad workstation.

This is not necessarily a bad thing however as a vast majority of users for the foreseeable future will never need to use the benefit of this technology.

Essentially they have a car that has all the fittings for a turbo but only a select few will ever need to buy one.

Let’s explain a little further.

house of 9 free download undiscovered movie download Your standard operating system used by a majority of the population has not been designed to use in reality much over 3 GB of ram at the very outside and for a majority of users 2 GB will be ample although many will be running with far less than this.

32-bit architectures theoretically address up to 4GB of memory. In reality, even if you have 4GB of RAM onboard and are using standard XP or Vista, you still can’t benefit from it all.

This is because in some instances your motherboard will not have been designed to utilize that much memory and even if it has, all of your hardware—your graphics card, your I/O cards etc. has to be mapped into that 4GB of memory space reducing the amount available to the applications (software) you use even further.

Most average users (non CAD and home users) will probably only have 1GB and in most cases far less in their machine and will not for the foreseeable future need to address massive amounts of ram, as the programs they use do not and often cannot use more than 1GB or 2GB of memory anyway.

If you have got less than 1Gb though it will be highly advantageous to upgrade your memory as this can give your system a much needed boost, even for a home users.

If you have a local friendly computer support company you can also ask them about memory upgrades as well if you don’t want to do one yourself

Even if you have a multi-core processors and have a number of applications (programs) running together, chances are high that you will not use much more than 1 -1.5 GB of physical memory.

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So for the average user 64 – bit computing is a bit of a white elephant and something they have no need to worry about.

For more great computing advice and articles visit the Computer Support and Repair blog.

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Category: Computer Tips

Comments (6)

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  1. peter says:

    what a poor article

  2. Chuck says:

    So Peter, why don’t you elaborate further? What makes this a poor article?

  3. Kevlar Armour says:

    I agree with Peter, a very misleading topic heading. Should have been
    'Why average Joe doesn't need 64bit'
    You didn't actually explain the benefits of 64bit at all.
    Is it faster, why?
    You explained briefly the con's but not pro's
    What Software is available? if any? is it better or worse
    What are the benefits of 64bit software, if any? to whom may it benefit
    for example would those who use their computers for Video rendering/capture/3d animators, would they gain any benefit?
    What are the cost implications of 64bit over 32bit?
    the list goes on

    Do some research, then try again.

  4. chrismartinau says:

    Adopting 64 bit has very few downsides, other than slightly larger binaries, when compiled 64 bit (32 bit binaries remain unchanged and run with no CPU performance overhead), and RAM is cheap. These days the price difference between a 2 GB and 4 GB system is about $50 for DDR2. 64 bit Vista costs no more, and if your machine can run Vista there's a damn good chance it's EM64T or AMD64. Therefore, if the cost is the same, or at worse $50 more, in total, and 32 bit software runs perfectly and 99% of manufacturers and now releasing 64 bit drivers, why NOT move to 64 bit? I've been running 64 bit for 8 years now, first 64 bit XP and now 64 bit Vista (soon to be Windows 7 64 bit) and have never had a problem running old software (if it runs on Vista 32 it'll run on Vista 64), but I get to go up a detail level in Crysis, UT2004 and all Source games for free, 7zip takes markedly less time to make files and I even get to use 64 bit video CODECs, meaning ripping DVDs takes much less time.

    If your hardware supports 64 bit, why not get the free upgrade? Seems stupid to stick your head in the sand and pretend that 64 bit isn't here, and the sooner that people use 64 bit en mass, the sooner software manufacturers will take 64 bit seriously and release 64 bit versions.

  5. chrismartinau says:

    Adopting 64 bit has very few downsides, other than slightly larger binaries, when compiled 64 bit (32 bit binaries remain unchanged and run with no CPU performance overhead), and RAM is cheap. These days the price difference between a 2 GB and 4 GB system is about $50 for DDR2. 64 bit Vista costs no more, and if your machine can run Vista there's a damn good chance it's EM64T or AMD64. Therefore, if the cost is the same, or at worse $50 more, in total, and 32 bit software runs perfectly and 99% of manufacturers and now releasing 64 bit drivers, why NOT move to 64 bit? I've been running 64 bit for 8 years now, first 64 bit XP and now 64 bit Vista (soon to be Windows 7 64 bit) and have never had a problem running old software (if it runs on Vista 32 it'll run on Vista 64), but I get to go up a detail level in Crysis, UT2004 and all Source games for free, 7zip takes markedly less time to make files and I even get to use 64 bit video CODECs, meaning ripping DVDs takes much less time.

    If your hardware supports 64 bit, why not get the free upgrade? Seems stupid to stick your head in the sand and pretend that 64 bit isn't here, and the sooner that people use 64 bit en mass, the sooner software manufacturers will take 64 bit seriously and release 64 bit versions.

  6. RobBaker says:

    I wish home PCs were made in 32bit versions only. I’m a self-employed PC repair engineer and 64bit machines make my life harder. Some programmes simply wont run on 64bit machines, plus its often harder to find 64 bit drivers for specific hardware, particularly older printers etc.

    Keep it simple. Keep it 32bit – unless you really need 64bit

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